Five Things a Bus Can Teach You About IoT Success

Rob Risany – Executive Vice President – IoT Strategy and Business Solutions at ADLINK Technology

I’m really proud of the work my CTO, Joe Speed, carried out at CES this year with CTA, IBM, and Local Motors on #AccessibleOlli. Front and center in the main hall of the exhibition, #AccessibleOlli showcases what happens when major industry players come together to solve real world problems. In this case, it’s about helping people with disabilities get around. You can get a real time feed on #AccessibleOlli by following #JoeSpeed on Twitter: https://twitter.com/JoeSpeeds

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Joe Speed, ADLINK IoT Solutions & Technology CTO at CES with #AccessibleOlli

I think there’s some great lessons to take away from the #AccessibleOlli program.

  1. Put the focus on the mission, not the technology. If you factor in all the cloud vendors, enterprise software companies, the computer hardware providers, below the radar startup vendors, AI platforms, sensor companies…. Let alone emerging technology coming out of academia – there’s a lot of technology out there. The only way to make sense of the plethora of technologies is to IGNORE THEM at the beginning of your initiative and focus on the outcome of your program. #AccessibleOlli started with a question: how can we make it easier for people with disabilities to get around? Technology provided perspectives on how to answer the question… but was NEVER the driving force for the initiative.
  2. IoT is a Team Sport. I’ve been in countless meetings with technology professionals who are bound and determined that THEY will build the real platform for IoT – and that no one else will be able to compete. Sorry, I don’t buy it. #AccessibleOlli has been successful because it’s a collaboration of many players, each with different skills. If you are being told – by either internal or external coaches – that one solution or one tech team has the IoT panacea – run, don’t walk, to the nearest exit.
  3. Continually question your solution. It’s so very easy to fall into the trap of declaring victory and stopping innovation. In a landscape shifting so fast, you have to look for new approaches continually. #AccesibleOlli has shifted over time from reliance on specific sensors to broader sensor fusion approaches, including LIDAR and 3d imagery.
  4. Arm your experts and get out of the way. IoT is so trendy right now, everyone wants a bit of it. With almost CIO on the planet right now measured on having an IoT program running by end of 2018, it would be easy to spin up a large cross functional “management task force” and noodle and micro-manage what needs to be done and the choices to make. #AccessibleOlli on the other hand has always been a bottom up program. Experts from a lot of fields came together and have created something amazing. This is not to say that it’s just about engineers – you need people who understand your customer and your mission intimately and those may be in your marketing or even you customer service department. But you don’t need seventeen vice presidents.
  5. Place Lots of Bets, not One Big One. Unlike other technology and industry shifts in the past – like big data or ERP – no one knows what the shape will be in the end. There is no perfect formula yet. Rather, the most successful are trying many ideas out simultaneously – it’s a time of experiments. #AccessibleOlli has evolved that way. What started as a test of digital printed car parts moved to an exploration of autonomous vehicle algorithms, to now a platform which communicates with the deaf and blind. Each stepwise move was a low cost test, touching a different angle of the mission. It has involved different contributors at every stage.

At ADLINK, we are committed to the mission of creating an easy on-ramp for our customers to use IoT as a tool to try new things in their businesses. #AccessibleOlli is a great example of the kinds of projects on which we love to work.

For more information on how ADLINK can help implement your own IoT digital experiment, contact us.

Building Autonomous and Connected Vehicle Systems with the Vortex IoT Data Sharing Platform Webcast

Date: 24th September 2015
Location: Online

Why Attend:

  • Learn how companies are today using the Vortex IoT Data Sharing Platform to build autonomous and connected vehicle systems,
  • Understand the common data sharing requirements for autonomous and connected vehicles,
  • Learn about Vortex’s features that make it ideal for connected and autonomous vehicles.

Abstract:

Although Autonomous and connected vehicles may sound somewhat futuristic applications of the Internet of Things (IoT), the reality is that these systems are being built and operated today in special environments. The design of these systems pose some unique challenges due to the constraints imposed by the criticality of the applications and the heterogeneity of the deployment environments. To put it another way, autonomous connected vehicles should not crash into each other, nor into other vehicles, whilst at the same time have to deal with connectivity that changes depending on their location, e.g. connectivity in down-town San Francisco may not be the same as the connectivity experience in the Joshua Tree National Park.

This webcast will (1) showcase how PrismTech’s Vortex Data Sharing Platform based on the Object Management Group’s Data Distribution Service (DDS) standard is used today as the foundation of several autonomous and connected vehicles, (2) summarize the key requirements characteristic of these types of application, and (3) introduce the Vortex features that make it a perfect match for connectivity in autonomous and connected vehicle platforms and applications.

The webcast will last approximately one hour.

Webcast Presenter:

Angelo Corsaro, Ph.D. is Chief Technology Officer (CTO) at PrismTech where he directs the technology strategy, planning, evolution, and evangelism. Angelo leads the strategic standardization at the Object Management Group (OMG), where he co-chairs the Data Distribution Service (DDS) Special Interest Group and serves on the Architecture Board. Angelo is a widely known and cited expert in the field of real-time and distributed systems, middleware, and software patterns, has authored several international standards and enjoys over 10+ years of experience in technology management and design of high performance mission- and business-critical distributed systems. Angelo received a Ph.D. and a M.S. in Computer Science from the Washington University in St. Louis, and a Laurea Magna cum Laude in Computer Engineering from the University of Catania, Italy.

Vortex intelligent data sharing platform selected by Harbrick for world’s first OS for building autonomous vehicles

PrismTech’s Vortex Intelligent Data Sharing Platform Selected by Harbrick for World’s First Operating System for Building Autonomous Vehicles

Robotics company Harbrick has selected Vortex™ to serve as the intelligent data sharing platform for its PolySync, the world’s first out-of-box operating system (OS) for autonomous vehicles.

PolySync is comprised of a set of software tools and services that make it easier to build advanced autonomous vehicles.  Similar to the benefits Android and iOS provide to mobile apps developers, PolySync is an OS for autonomous vehicles that provides a massive plug and play ecosystem of sensors, actuators, computing hardware, and third party software.  It uses a standardized API that transforms autonomous vehicle development into app development.  PolySync handles the sensor drivers, data management, and fault tolerance.

“Working with the PrismTech team allows us to stand on the shoulders of giants,” said Josh Hartung, CEO of Harbrick.  “PrismTech’s track record of success providing real-time distributed system solutions for a variety of mission and safety critical environments, along with its outstanding tooling and customer support, is a perfect fit for our needs.”

Vortex serves as the data sharing backbone for PolySync by controlling, monitoring, and regulating the data interfaces—ensuring the right data gets to the right place in real-time.  Vortex provides PolySync with the platform to optimize data accessibility and usability.

Vortex enabled Harbrick to utilize development resources more effectively.  Specifically, Harbrick would have needed to employ a team 10 times larger over the period of one year to build the required feature set for the first commercial release.  Vortex tooling has been measured to reduce debugging by as much as 52 percent and increase new feature development by a multiple of 16.

“The autonomous vehicle industry provides an exciting opportunity for PrismTech to deliver its high performance data-sharing platform into a growing market sector,” said Spiros Motsenigos, VP US Sales, PrismTech.  “The technologies that are fueling this industry are continuing to develop and Vortex is proving to serve as a catalyst to this growth.”

Vortex is based on the OMG™’s Data Distribution Service (DDS) open standard and builds on proven technologies to provide an efficient solution for device-to-device, device-to-cloud and cloud-to-cloud Internet scale real-time data sharing.  It is a crucial enabler for systems that have to reliably and securely deliver high volumes of data with stringent end-to-end qualities-of-service (QoS) facilitating its ability to deliver the right information to the right place at the right time.

For further information about Vortex please visit PrismTech’s website at: http://www.prismtech.com/vortex.